Monday, June 4, 2018

Break out of your rut!

I have been thinking about my craft.  A scrum master is a coach, therapist, and advocate for their team.  We have emotional ups and downs in the profession.  We are also fortunate enough to make a difference in the organizations we work.  It is rewarding but filled with the trade-offs professionals are confronted.  This week wanted to discuss a constant force in the life of a scrum master continuous improvement.

As a professional, it is easy to get into a rut.  Decision fatigue sets in and so you order the same thing for lunch or manage how you deliver software.  Routine and inertia are comfortable because it provides a false sense of security in an uncertain world.  Your heart could stop from a simple blob of cholesterol or the company share price could crumble overnight, but thanks to the routine we ignore these catastrophes.  Inertia is safe and secure.  It is also the enemy of continuous improvement and agility.  It is why scrum requires retrospectives.  The feedback allows everyone evaluate how to improve. Development includes the product owners and the scrum master.

I was doing a product increment planning meeting for the product owners to coordinate releases and plan for the future.  On a whim, I decided to include a retrospective of the last quarter to get a sense of where we are and where we are going.  A tense hour later a few lessons were learned.  Using a four “L” retrospective, I wanted to understand how as a product development team we were doing.  The answer was unambiguous.  Some things which we could control had to change.  The retrospective included passive aggressive conduct, and a few choice criticisms pointed at me.  It was worth it.

Based on what I learned, I am going to conduct retrospectives differently with the development teams.  I am going to work with the product owners more closely to help them manage their work more closely.   Finally, I am going to try and break out of my decision fatigue.  Continuous improvement matters, and if you expect it of others, then you should expect it of yourself.

Until next time.