Monday, May 22, 2017

Avoid cynicism by networking

Never be a dark scrum master
After a few years working as a scrum master, a person can develop some gallows humor.  Every excuse elicits a chuckle of dark laughter.  Each setback and technical glitch generate a wry smile of world-weary acknowledgment.  This cynical detachment is a survival mechanism; otherwise, you spiral into a cycle of depression.  The trouble with this strategy is that cynicism is not a good way to lead others.  This week I want to talk about avoiding the trap of cynicism.

One of the great things about the Agile community is there are trade associations to support the people doing the hard work.  There are the Scrum Alliance and the Scaled Agile community who provide support.  These organizations also have trade shows and conferences which act as a means to provide continuing educations.  The biggest benefit to these agencies is that we are put in touch with like-minded people, and we support each other.

Former Secretary of State Collin Powel says, “Leadership is lonely.”  As an agile coach and scrum master, most of your time is spent in the lonely activity of leadership.  You are a member of the team but you also apart from it.  You are training product owners and helping developers improve.  You are also answering to management educating them on how Agile works and how the teams are delivering software.  This loneliness creates social isolation at work.

This is why I enjoy getting together with other agile professionals at user groups and conferences.  We can swap stories, exchange solutions to common problems and be a source of moral support.  It is nice to speak the same lingo to others and to understand your struggles making organizations better are their struggles.  For a few hours each month, I feel a little less lonely.

This is why I encourage others to attend networking events, training, and conferences.  The knowledge gained is valuable but the moral support from your peer’s help you fight off cynicism.

Until next time.